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Does “queue time” really impact customer loyalty or satisfaction?

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Does “queue time” really impact customer loyalty or satisfaction?

Queue time is one of the many metrics contact centre mangers optimize their staffing models around. Simply put,  this metric measures the time the average customers spends waiting in queue for an employee to answer his query. This simple metric has many names within the multi-lingual contact centre industry; average wait time, average speed to answer and many more.

For a long time ACD stats used to be the only way to acquire reliable metrics, the contact centre industry simply had no other choice. Those stats and the metrics they produced used to be our only “compass” when it came to reading efficiency and effectives of customer service.

But as the customer service landscape is changing, so are the metrics, and new possibilities arise and take the scene by storm.

“Net Promoter Score” and “Customer Effort Score” are nothing new for leading brands and many business managers. Those two metrics are designed to measure customer lifetime value, focusing on long term values instead of short term cost optimization only.

The best part about introducing and implementing new metrics is the opportunity to correlate them against the old ones.

Are we optimizing towards the wrong metrics?

Customers can be perfectly happy and pleased with the customer experience even if they had to wait 15 minutes or more in queue, what matters is the outcome and the customer journey up until the very end.

But as with all metrics, there are flaws. Net Promoter Score and Customer Effort Score take a huge negative impact from just transferring a call to another agent – this kills the scores almost instantly.

So you can only imagine what happens when a customer query needs to be transferred to multiple agents.

Instead of the “out with the old, in with the new” approach, the contact centre industry needs to embrace the best of both worlds, instead of “hopping on a bandwagon” once again.